Cracker Snacker Part II

Vegan Cheesy Crackers

My favorite savory cracker recipe was created by my good friend and fellow blogger, Celine. She has a knack for developing delicious and unique recipes, all beautifully photographed. When I am craving savory crackers, I often turn to her Cheezy Quackers recipe for satiation. They are incredibly addictive and it’s easy to eat an entire batch because they are so tiny.

The crackers pictured above are adapted from The Vegan Lunch Box blog. I substituted whole grain flours, increased the nutritional yeast, added garlic powder, and topped them with poppy seeds. Otherwise I followed the recipe as posted. They definitely remind me Pepperidge Farm Goldfish Crackers, but obviously way better for you (and homemade!). They take some time but the results are worth it. I think they need a bit more seasoning so I may adjust my next batch.

If you are craving savory crackers you should give the above recipes a try!

Cracker Snacker

Graham Crackers from Vegan Cookies Invade Your Cookie Jar

Crackers. I have a troubling obsession with crackers. It doesn’t matter if they are square or round. It doesn’t matter if they are savory or sweet. What matters is that they are in my possession, whether that be in my pockets or in a box. I love crackers.

When I woke up this morning I decided it would be fun to make some graham crackers. My plans were halted by a lack of ingredients. So Tim and I waited patiently until the steady downpour of rain stopped and hopped on our bikes for a ride to the co-op. A few minutes later we found ourselves riding into solid sheets of rain mixed with nasty gusts of wind. I like to think I’m a tough cookie, but I was clenching my handlebars so tightly that my fingers went numb. We arrived at the co-op and dripped puddles with every step. We rode back home in the rain with ingredients for crackers. I spent the rest of the day in my jammies making graham crackers and cheesy crackers.

Now I am full of crackers and quite content. Foul weather can’t keep me from crackers.

“Q” is for Quinoa Rosemary Crackers

The world needs more foods that begin with the letter Q! I contemplated quiche and quince after reader suggestions, but the weather in Portland has kept me burrowing in my apartment trying to keep warm. In other words, I was too lazy to ride my bike to the co-op for quince and way too lazy to attempt my first quiche. It was either quesadillas or something fun with quinoa. Since quinoa is basically protein with a curly sprout, I figured it deserved some extra attention.

See the cute lil’ rosemary sprig sprouting from the pumpkin seed? :-)

In my neighborhood, rosemary plants grow in monstrous masses along sidewalks. Folks are free to clip off sprigs as they wish. I had some street-plucked, home-dried rosemary in my pantry that I used in my pizza pretzels yesterday and decided it would be a nice addition to the quinoa crackers I wanted to make today. The combination of quinoa and rosemary is quite nice (and pretty if you use red quinoa!).

Quinoa Rosemary Crackers

These are adapted from Celine’s infamous Cheezy Quackers

Ingredients:

1 cup whole grain spelt flour, plus extra as needed
1/4 cup non-dairy butter
1/2 cup cooked quinoa
2 Tablespoons nutritional yeast
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon dried, ground rosemary
few twists of freshly ground black pepper, optional
coarse salt, extra ground rosemary, and seeds for sprinkling

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees and line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a Silpat.
2. In the bowl of a food processor, combine flour and non-dairy butter. Process until it resembles fine crumbs.
3. Add in cooked quinoa, nutritional yeast, salt, rosemary, and pepper (if using).
4. Process mixture until a wet dough forms and then add additional flour, 1 Tablespoon at a time, until the dough is no longer sticky or wet. The amount of flour you add will depend on your quinoa. I added about 2 Tablespoons additional flour to my batch.
5. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and roll into a rectangle about 1/8″ thick. Using whatever cookie/biscuit cutter suits your fancy, cut out shapes and place them on your prepared baking sheet. Sprinkle with salt, ground rosemary, and seeds. Gently press the seeds into the crackers.
6. Bake for 15-20 minutes, depending on the size of your crackers. Rotate the pan halfway through baking, and check them after 10 minutes to make sure they don’t burn.
7. Allow crackers to cool, if you can wait long enough (I couldn’t), before eating. They will crisp up once they cool, so don’t fret!